TRADE BARRIERS TOPPED AGENDA AT KENYA-SOUTH AFRICA BUSINESS SUMMIT IN NAIROBI

NAIROBI– Weaknesses in the two countries’ value addition chains as well non-tariff barriers have emerged as the main hindrances in bilateral trade when business people from Kenya and South Africa held a joint summit in Nairobi Monday to seek investment opportunities in each other’s country.

The Trade and Investment mission, comprising representatives of 19 South African companies who met their Kenyan counterparts here Monday, will have a similar summit in Tanzania later this week. On the first day of the three-day Business Summit here, the Kenyan business people lamented the trade imbalance between the two regional economic powerhouses.

The latest data showed that exports from Kenya to South Africa at below three per cent of imports from South Africa. The total exports to South Africa dropped in 2017 to 26.78 million US dollars from 40.68 million USD in 2016, while Kenya’s imports from South Africa increased to 600 million USD in 2017 from 488 million USD in 2016, said Angela Ndambuki, the chief executive officer of the Kenya National Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KCCI).

The meeting is being held with the aim of bridging that gap. The question that is before us is what are we doing differently and I think we are known as Africans, we are known we are good at implementation, very good, said South Africa’s Ambassador to Kenya, Koleka Mqulwana.

A lack of value addition was identified as one of the setbacks for Kenya’s low exports to South Africa. Kenyan businessmen also lamented non-tariff barriers like lengthy paperwork and bureaucracy, as some of the impediments to accessing the South African market.

I have made several trips to South Africa to the permit office in Pretoria trying to get an import licence for camel meat and milk but to this date we do not have any joy from that side, said Kenyan livestock trader Mohammed Abdi Mohammed.

Not one to give up, Mohammed has devised other ways of accessing the market. They go to Mauritius, they are slaughtered, they are packaged and then sent to South Africa.

Kenya is also hoping to tap into South Africa’s more developed manufacturing sector.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

TRADE BARRIERS TOPPED AGENDA AT KENYA-SOUTH AFRICA BUSINESS SUMMIT IN NAIROBI

NAIROBI– Weaknesses in the two countries’ value addition chains as well non-tariff barriers have emerged as the main hindrances in bilateral trade when business people from Kenya and South Africa held a joint summit in Nairobi Monday to seek investment opportunities in each other’s country.

The Trade and Investment mission, comprising representatives of 19 South African companies who met their Kenyan counterparts here Monday, will have a similar summit in Tanzania later this week. On the first day of the three-day Business Summit here, the Kenyan business people lamented the trade imbalance between the two regional economic powerhouses.

The latest data showed that exports from Kenya to South Africa at below three per cent of imports from South Africa. The total exports to South Africa dropped in 2017 to 26.78 million US dollars from 40.68 million USD in 2016, while Kenya’s imports from South Africa increased to 600 million USD in 2017 from 488 million USD in 2016, said Angela Ndambuki, the chief executive officer of the Kenya National Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KCCI).

The meeting is being held with the aim of bridging that gap. The question that is before us is what are we doing differently and I think we are known as Africans, we are known we are good at implementation, very good, said South Africa’s Ambassador to Kenya, Koleka Mqulwana.

A lack of value addition was identified as one of the setbacks for Kenya’s low exports to South Africa. Kenyan businessmen also lamented non-tariff barriers like lengthy paperwork and bureaucracy, as some of the impediments to accessing the South African market.

I have made several trips to South Africa to the permit office in Pretoria trying to get an import licence for camel meat and milk but to this date we do not have any joy from that side, said Kenyan livestock trader Mohammed Abdi Mohammed.

Not one to give up, Mohammed has devised other ways of accessing the market. They go to Mauritius, they are slaughtered, they are packaged and then sent to South Africa.

Kenya is also hoping to tap into South Africa’s more developed manufacturing sector.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK