Daily Archives: May 2, 2018

YPO Innovation Week Unites Global Innovators for Africa Ignite Event

Signature Event in Kenya Will Feature Cutting-Edge Insights from a Selection of Africa’s Most Innovative Thought and Business Leaders

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, May 02, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As part of its third annual YPO Innovation Week, YPO will host Africa Ignite in Nairobi, Kenya, convening more than 140 senior executives to discuss and brainstorm how technology is transforming business operations in Africa and around the world.

YPO Innovation Week is a series of more than 50 events conducted in over 30 countries throughout the world from 7-11 May 2018, featuring dynamic global innovators who will come together to share best-in-class business strategies as well as timely and relevant insights that are fueling innovation and shaping the future of global business over the next decade.

Through lectures, workshops and site visits, Africa Ignite will focus on the opportunities and challenges of doing business in Africa, while highlighting Africa’s spirit of innovation.

“Africa is a hotbed of innovation, as will be showcased throughout Africa Ignite 2018,” says YPO Africa Ignite Co-Champion Dhruv Pandit, CEO of Fedha Group. “YPO members from across Africa will share experiences with each other and learn from truly innovative businesses that are already disrupting the African landscape in a positive way.”

Featured speakers include:

  • Craig Wing, Partner of FutureWorld International
  • Rob Burnet, a two-time Emmy Award winning producer and founder and CEO of Well Told Story
  • Eric Hersman, Founder and CEO of BRCK and Founder of iHUB
  • Vishal Agarwal, Chairman and Chief Executive of Full Circle Africa and YPO member
  • Jon Foster-Pedley, Dean of the Henley Business School

Co-Champion Chirag Sanghrajka, Managing Director of Cape Holdings Ltd., adds, “The event sold out in record time, and we look forward to welcoming over 140 top CEOs from across Africa and beyond.”

YPO Innovation Week is a global event during which the world’s most innovative companies share their inspiration and insights. YPO Innovation Week is designed for YPO leaders who are responsible for vision, strategy, information and technology who are charged with driving innovation — across industries and sectors.

Through signature Innovation Week events, live two-way interactive video casts and livestream events, business leaders will learn how to keep pace with innovation trends on a global scale, innovate and disrupt industry practices, nurture and develop value-creating ideas across organizations and positively impact communities, industries and the world.

Additional Innovation Week signature events will be held between 7-11 May 2018 in major cities including Sydney, Australia; London, England; New York, New York, USA; Santa Domingo, Dominican Republic; and Silicon Valley, California, USA.

For more information, visit the YPO Innovation Week website.

ABOUT YPO

The premier leadership organization of chief executives in the world.

YPO is the global platform for chief executives to engage, learn and grow. YPO members harness the knowledge, influence and trust of the world’s most influential and innovative business leaders to inspire business, personal, family and community impact.

Today, YPO empowers more than 25,000 members in more than 130 countries, diversified among industries and types of businesses. Altogether, YPO member-run companies employ 16 million people and generate USD6 trillion in annual revenues.

Leadership. Learning. Lifelong. For more information, visit YPO.org.

Contact:
YPO
Linda Fisk
Office: +1 972 629 7305 (United States)
Mobile: +1 972 207 4298
press@ypo.org

SOUTH AFRICA LAUNCHES AFRICA MONTH CELEBRATION

CAPE TOWN– South African Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa on Tuesday launched the fourth edition of the commemoration of Africa Month celebrations in Cape Town.

Activities for this year’s Africa Month were outlined at the launch which took place at the Artscape Theatre Centre in Cape Town under the theme, The Year of Nelson Mandela: Building a Better Africa and a Better World”.

The Month of May is declared Africa Month to commemorate the founding of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) on May 25, 1963. It was on this date that 25 May was declared as Africa Day as a symbol of unity amongst all Africans.

Africa Month is conceptualised within the context of several policies and legislative instruments that guide what South Africa wants to achieve domestically and internationally. In this regard, the principles of the National Development Plan 2030 and Outcome 11 and 14 of the Medium Term Strategy Framework (MTSF) objectives become the pillars of Africa Month, the Arts and Culture Department said on Monday.

By establishing the OAU in May 25, 1963, now known as the African Union, Africa became a pioneer by being the first continent to focus on and encourage nation building through unity and freedom from oppression, it said.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

SOUTH AFRICA DISAPPOINTED AT US DECISION ON STEEL, ALUMINIUM TARIIFF

PRETORIA– South Africa has expressed disappointment at not being granted exemption from the United States Section 232 steel and aluminium tariff duties.

On Monday, US President Donald Trump signed proclamations granting permanent country-exemptions to a select number of countries and extended by one month the Section 232 steel and aluminium tariff duty exemptions for some.

South Africa is disappointed that it was not granted an exemption from the duties, the Department of Trade and Industry said here Tuesday.

Monday’s proclamation followed the 8 March proclamation signed by President Trump to impose a 10 per cent ad valorem tariff on imports of aluminium articles and a 25 per cent ad valorem tariff on imports of steel articles. These excluded select countrie,s including Canada, Mexico, the European Union, South Korea, Australia, Argentina and Brazil.

The proclamation followed reports from the Secretary of Commerce that imports of these products threaten to impair US national security.

South Africa, through Minister of Trade and Industry Rob Davies, made representations to the US, including two written submissions. In addition, South African Ambassador to the US Mninwa Mahlangu also engaged with the White House National Security Council staff, State Department, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) and Commerce Department.

Davies also had teleconferences with Ambassador CJ Mahoney, the Deputy USTR for Investment, Services, Labour, Environment, Africa, China and the Western Hemisphere on March 22, 2018 and again on April 30, 2018. In the submissions, South Africa argued that it itself is grappling with the consequences of the global steel glut and that it has stringent Customs control measures and that there is no risk of circumvention or transhipment of steel from third countries.

South Africa further emphasised that its exports of aluminium products per annum are equivalent to about 1.6% of total US aluminium imports. According to the US Census Bureau data, in 2017 the US imported a total of 33.4 million tons of steel, of which imports from South Africa were approximately 330,000 tons or 0.98 per cent of total US imports and 0.3 per cent of total US steel demand of 107 million tons.

The 330,000 tons exported from South Africa represents 5.0 per cent of South Africa’s production. As such, South Africa does not pose a threat to US national security and to the US steel and aluminium industries but is a source of strategic primary and secondary products used in further value added manufacturing in the US contributing to jobs in both countries. However, due to these measures, South Africa will be disproportionately affected both in terms of jobs and productive capacity.

The country also offered to restrict exports to a quota based on 2017 exports level. However, despite these assurances, the United States has decided not to exempt South Africa from the duties. It is important to note that some of the exempted countries are the biggest exporters of steel and aluminium to the United States, said the Trade and Industry Department.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

SOUTH AFRICA DISAPPOINTED AT US DECISION ON STEEL, ALUMINIUM TARIIFF

PRETORIA– South Africa has expressed disappointment at not being granted exemption from the United States Section 232 steel and aluminium tariff duties.

On Monday, US President Donald Trump signed proclamations granting permanent country-exemptions to a select number of countries and extended by one month the Section 232 steel and aluminium tariff duty exemptions for some.

South Africa is disappointed that it was not granted an exemption from the duties, the Department of Trade and Industry said here Tuesday.

Monday’s proclamation followed the 8 March proclamation signed by President Trump to impose a 10 per cent ad valorem tariff on imports of aluminium articles and a 25 per cent ad valorem tariff on imports of steel articles. These excluded select countrie,s including Canada, Mexico, the European Union, South Korea, Australia, Argentina and Brazil.

The proclamation followed reports from the Secretary of Commerce that imports of these products threaten to impair US national security.

South Africa, through Minister of Trade and Industry Rob Davies, made representations to the US, including two written submissions. In addition, South African Ambassador to the US Mninwa Mahlangu also engaged with the White House National Security Council staff, State Department, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) and Commerce Department.

Davies also had teleconferences with Ambassador CJ Mahoney, the Deputy USTR for Investment, Services, Labour, Environment, Africa, China and the Western Hemisphere on March 22, 2018 and again on April 30, 2018. In the submissions, South Africa argued that it itself is grappling with the consequences of the global steel glut and that it has stringent Customs control measures and that there is no risk of circumvention or transhipment of steel from third countries.

South Africa further emphasised that its exports of aluminium products per annum are equivalent to about 1.6% of total US aluminium imports. According to the US Census Bureau data, in 2017 the US imported a total of 33.4 million tons of steel, of which imports from South Africa were approximately 330,000 tons or 0.98 per cent of total US imports and 0.3 per cent of total US steel demand of 107 million tons.

The 330,000 tons exported from South Africa represents 5.0 per cent of South Africa’s production. As such, South Africa does not pose a threat to US national security and to the US steel and aluminium industries but is a source of strategic primary and secondary products used in further value added manufacturing in the US contributing to jobs in both countries. However, due to these measures, South Africa will be disproportionately affected both in terms of jobs and productive capacity.

The country also offered to restrict exports to a quota based on 2017 exports level. However, despite these assurances, the United States has decided not to exempt South Africa from the duties. It is important to note that some of the exempted countries are the biggest exporters of steel and aluminium to the United States, said the Trade and Industry Department.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK