Daily Archives: February 12, 2018

Authentix® Selected by Zambia as Technology & Services Partner to Combat Illicit Fuels

ADDISON, Texas, Feb. 12, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Authentix, a leading global authentication and information services company, announces The Energy Regulation Board (ERB) of Zambia has selected, after a public procurement tender process, Authentix as its technology and services partner to combat the illicit trade of refined fuels. The program is scheduled to commence February 15, 2018.

The Authentix covert fuel marking program will support the Zambian government’s fuel integrity program and the government’s commitment to ensure a clean and high quality fuel supply to support local commerce. Illicit fuels smuggled into the country or fuel adulterated with inferior products, do not meet the ERB’s high quality standards for fuels and may also include harmful substances that can pose a threat to public health and the environment.

In addition to the positive environmental and societal impact, the Authentix fuel marking program will return positive economic results. “In our experience operating nine fuel marking programs across Africa, the return-on-investment measured by recovered excise taxes far outweighs the operational costs of the program,” stated Kevin McKenna, Chief Sales and Services Officer, Authentix, Inc. “In twenty years of designing and operating covert fuel marking programs, we estimate to have recovered over USD 1 billion to governments.”

Authentix assisted the ERB in assessing the current supply chain, designing a program to meet their goals –including enforcement, and selecting from Authentix portfolio of covert chemical markers and analyzers, to deliver the most effective program tailored to Zambia’s unique needs.

To learn more about Authentix’s fuel supply integrity offering, visit http://www.authentix.com/offerings/vigilant/.

About Authentix:
Authentix assists customers in combating illicit trade and managing the integrity of their global supply chains.  With comprehensive end-to-end authentication solutions we help safeguard customers in refined fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, lubes, and LPG) and branded products (e.g., pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and spirits industries) from counterfeiting, product theft, product diversion, and adulteration. In addition, we help protect currencies for many leading central banks.

Headquartered in Addison, Texas USA, Authentix, Inc. has offices in the US, UK, UAE, and Africa serving clients worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.authentix.com.

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La société Authentix® a été sélectionnée par la Zambie en tant que partenaire de technologie et de services pour lutter contre les carburants illicites

ADDISON, Texas, 12 février 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Authentix, une société mondiale de services d’authentification et d’information de premier plan, annonce que le Conseil de règlementation de l’énergie (Energy Regulation Board (ERB)) de Zambie, a, après un processus de marché public, sélectionné Authentix en tant que partenaire de technologie et de services dans le but de lutter contre le commerce illicite de carburants raffinés. Le programme devrait commencer le 15 février 2018.

Le programme de marquage secret de carburant d’Authentix appuiera le programme d’intégrité du carburant du gouvernement de Zambie et son engagement à assurer un approvisionnement en carburant propre de haute qualité pour soutenir le commerce local. Les carburants illicites qui entrent en contrebande dans le pays ou le carburant adultéré avec des produits inférieurs ne répondent pas aux normes de haute qualité de l’ERB pour les carburants et peuvent également contenir des substances nuisibles mettant en danger la santé du public et de l’environnement.

Outre l’impact positif sur l’environnement et la société, le programme de marquage de carburant d’Authentix génèrera des résultats économiques positifs. « Notre expérience après avoir réalisé neuf programmes de marquage de carburant en Afrique a montré que le retour sur investissement mesuré par les taxes d’accise récupérées l’emporte largement sur les coûts opérationnels du programme », a déclaré Kevin McKenna, directeur des ventes et des services chez Authentix, Inc. « Dans les vingt années que nous avons passées à concevoir et mettre en œuvre des programmes de marquage secret du carburant, nous estimons avoir récupéré plus d’un milliard USD pour les gouvernements. »

Authentix a aidé l’ERB à évaluer la chaîne d’approvisionnement actuelle, concevoir un programme répondant à leurs objectifs – y compris l’application et la sélection parmi le portefeuille de marqueurs et d’analyseurs chimiques secrets d’Authentix, pour fournir le programme le plus efficace personnalisé pour les exigences particulières de la Zambie.

Pour en savoir plus sur l’offre d’intégrité de l’approvisionnement en carburant d’Authentix, visiter http://www.authentix.com/offerings/vigilant/.

À propos d’Authentix :
Authentix aide ses clients à lutter contre le commerce illicite et à gérer l’intégrité de leurs chaines d’approvisionnement globales.  Avec des solutions d’authentification complètes de bout en bout, nous aidons les clients à protéger leurs carburants raffinés (p. ex, essence, diesel, lubrifiants et GPL) et leurs produits de marque (pharmaceutiques, agrochimiques et spiritueux) contre la contrefaçon, le vol de produits, le détournement de produits et leur adultération. Nous protégeons également les devises de nombreuses banques centrales de premier plan.

Authentix Inc., qui a son siège à Addison, Texas, aux États-Unis, compte des bureaux aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, aux Émirats arabes unis et en Afrique qui servent des clients à l’échelle mondiale. Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous sur http://www.authentix.com.

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UN: Human Rights Declaration Still Relevant

The United Nations is embarked on a year-long campaign to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the U.N. General Assembly on December 10, 1948. Campaigners say the declaration is as relevant today as it was when drafted seven decades ago.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted in Paris in 1948 by a diverse group of countries under the leadership of former first lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt. The Declaration was designed to prevent the repetition of the horrific human rights violations that were committed during World War II.

The common thread in the Universal Declaration is that of anti-discrimination; the belief that everyone is equal and everyone has the same rights. U.N. Human Rights spokesman Rupert Colville says many of the world’s human rights violations and problems stem from the failure to uphold that principle.

I think in the current climate a lot of those issues are really crystallizing. You look at the #Me2 Movement,” he said. “So, even with all the advances there have been on women’s rights over the past 70 years, and there have been huge advances on women’s rights, nevertheless, suddenly you get the #Me2 Movement. And suddenly everyone realizes all sorts of ghastly stuff is going on affecting women, even the most privileged women in the most democratic and well-established countries.

Colville notes human rights are not a given. He says it is a continuous struggle to get them and once that has been achieved to keep them.

Human Rights advocates believe in the Universal Declaration’s resilience. But they acknowledge this essential document will be challenged in the years ahead by new complex issues including rights to privacy and freedom of expression in the Internet age and the threat climate change poses to the right to life, food, water and housing.

Source: Voice of America

UN: Human Rights Declaration Still Relevant

The United Nations is embarked on a year-long campaign to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the U.N. General Assembly on December 10, 1948. Campaigners say the declaration is as relevant today as it was when drafted seven decades ago.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted in Paris in 1948 by a diverse group of countries under the leadership of former first lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt. The Declaration was designed to prevent the repetition of the horrific human rights violations that were committed during World War II.

The common thread in the Universal Declaration is that of anti-discrimination; the belief that everyone is equal and everyone has the same rights. U.N. Human Rights spokesman Rupert Colville says many of the world’s human rights violations and problems stem from the failure to uphold that principle.

I think in the current climate a lot of those issues are really crystallizing. You look at the #Me2 Movement,” he said. “So, even with all the advances there have been on women’s rights over the past 70 years, and there have been huge advances on women’s rights, nevertheless, suddenly you get the #Me2 Movement. And suddenly everyone realizes all sorts of ghastly stuff is going on affecting women, even the most privileged women in the most democratic and well-established countries.

Colville notes human rights are not a given. He says it is a continuous struggle to get them and once that has been achieved to keep them.

Human Rights advocates believe in the Universal Declaration’s resilience. But they acknowledge this essential document will be challenged in the years ahead by new complex issues including rights to privacy and freedom of expression in the Internet age and the threat climate change poses to the right to life, food, water and housing.

Source: Voice of America

African Immigrant Truckers Turn a Profit on Open Road

It’s a long way from Abidjan in the Ivory Coast to the interstate highway near Chicago where trucker Mamoudou Diawara relishes the advantages that come with traveling the open road.

“Trucking is the freedom,” Diawara says. “It is the freedom and the money is right. I am not going to lie to you. You make more than the average Joe.”

Increasing demand for long-haul truckers in the United States is drawing more African immigrants like Diawara onto America’s roads. He says truckers in the United States can make as much as $200,000 a year. The sometimes dangerous work involves long hours, but it’s a chance to make a new life in a new country on his terms.

“You got to get the goods to the people,” he says. “This is how the country is built. It does not matter where you were born, you can be whatever you want. This is what this country teaches me everyday.”

Elias Balima took a similar journey from Burkina Faso. He saved for years to buy this truck and now not a day passes without someone offering him work.

“People like me who did not go far in the school system, it is an opportunity for us,” Balima says. “It is tiresome. But after the labor, the result is good.”

After several days on the road stuck inside a five-square-meter compartment, it’s the little things that count � like a free shower. And a good night’s sleep after a long day’s drive.

But time is money so Balima is up early. On this morning, he’s thinking of home.

“I am almost 34 years old now. I am still not married,” he says. “Because I cannot make my mind up. My mind is between Africa and America. Sometimes I see younger brothers newly arrived from Africa telling me, ‘I will not stay more than two years in the States.'”

As much as Balima and Diawara have grown to love McDonald’s french fries and the opportunities and freedoms in America, they believe that in the current political climate, many Americans will always see them as Africans.

Balima says he tries to stay out of the U.S. immigration debate.

“I know they are all politicians,” he says. “I am not afraid of him. If Americans did not like Trump, he would not be where he is today.”

Most of the time there’s no room for politics inside Balima’s cab. For these African immigrants turned American truckers – keeping their eyes on the road is the key to success.

Source: Voice of America