Daily Archives: February 8, 2018

AACSB Announces the 2018 Class of Influential Leaders

Third annual Influential Leaders Challenge celebrates 29 change-makers and their impact on global issues

TAMPA, Florida, Feb. 8, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Today, AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the world’s largest business education network, celebrated the positive impact business school graduates are making in communities around the globe as part of the 2018 Influential Leaders Challenge. As an annual initiative, the challenge honors notable alumni from accredited schools whose inspiring work serves as a model for the next generation of business leaders. The class of 2018, announced at AACSB’s 2018 Deans Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, recognizes 29 business pioneers, from 13 industry sectors, whose careers are addressing today’s most pressing social, economic, environmental, and educational challenges.

Founded in 1916, AACSB International (AACSB) is the world's largest business education alliance--connecting students, academia, and business. As a nonprofit membership organization AACSB's mission is to foster engagement, accelerate innovation, and amplify impact within business education. With headquarters in North America, the Asia Pacific, and Europe, it is a global association of more than 1,600 institutions and organizations, across 99 countries and territories. Focused on preparing the future with responsible, global leaders through the highest quality of standards in business education, AACSB accredits more than 795 business schools worldwide.

“Each honoree from the 2018 class of Influential Leaders reflects the mindset, knowledge, and passion that impactful business leaders must embody to impart positive change in today’s society,” said Thomas R. Robinson, president and CEO of AACSB. “As business schools work to educate and mold the next generation of global business leaders, these 29 stories of achievement demonstrate the true excellence and leadership we wish to see in the world.”

Honorees of the 2018 Influential Leaders challenge were recognized across three categories, including:

  • Alumni Business Leaders Working in Nonprofit or Community-Based Organizations
    Leaders serving nonprofit and community-based organizations are making game-changing impacts—from a local level to a global reach—creating a better society for us all. With initiatives that include navigating the Hurricane Harvey crisis, transforming the lives of more than 150 million children around the world annually, and combating the root causes of poverty, AACSB graduates demonstrate that some of the world’s most impactful work occurs within small sector opportunities.
  • Alumni Business Leaders Advancing Diversity and Inclusion
    Advocates for diversity and inclusion are driving transformation across the corporate sphere by upholding a culture of mutual respect and championing the exchange of open ideas. Such efforts are furthered by leaders who forge and refine inclusion practices to break down cultural stereotypes and patriarchal norms. They also look to inspire today’s youth in underrepresented populations to pursue their dreams in non-traditional fields of study and professions.
  • Business Leaders Influencing Business Education
    Businesses need students to be workforce ready, making the present a critical time for schools and businesses to work together to meet each other’s needs. Outside of academe, some business leaders are driving partnerships between the two groups by cultivating a spirit of entrepreneurship and cross-collaborative mindsets. Others are developing free study services—available via a simple digital exchange—to more than 350,000 students globally, advancing access to success for everyone. Inside academe, leaders are transforming institutional culture by encouraging open dialogue between alumni, faculty, staff, business, and students, while investing in entrepreneurs across advantaged and disadvantaged regions.  

For more information on the Influential Leaders Challenge, and to view a full list of honorees, visit www.aacsb.edu/influential-leaders.

About AACSB International
As the world’s largest business education alliance, AACSB connects educators, students, and business to achieve a common goal: to create the next generation of great leaders. Synonymous with the highest standards of excellence, AACSB provides quality assurance, business education intelligence, and professional development services to almost 1,600 member organizations and more than 795 accredited business schools worldwide. With its global headquarters in Tampa, Florida, USA; Europe, Middle East, and Africa headquarters in Amsterdam, the Netherlands; and Asia Pacific headquarters in Singapore, AACSB’s mission is to foster engagement, accelerate innovation, and amplify impact in business education. For more information, visit aacsb.edu .

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GLOBAL EXPERTS PRODUCE PEST MANAGEMENT GUIDE TO FIGHT SPREAD OF FALL ARMYWORM

ADDIS ABABA– Global experts have produced a new comprehensive integrated pest management guide to fight the spread of the Fall Armyworm (FAW) which poses a critical food security threat in Africa, says the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

The guide is expected to help scientists, plant protection organizations, extension services agencies, research institutions and governments working with farmers to tackle the spread of the pest in Africa.

The FAW, which is actually the larval stage of a moth, poses a serious threat to food security and livelihoods of millions of smallholder farm households in Africa, because of its rapid spread and distinctive ability to inflict widespread damage across multiple crops.

It is an invasive crop pest which can feed on 80 different crop species, including maize, a staple food consumed by more than 300 million farm families in Africa.

The pest was first confirmed in Africa in 2016. The moth is not native to Africa and is believed to have been unknowingly transported to the continent from South America.

Experts warn that the emergence and rapid spread of the pest in Africa seriously threatens the food and income security of hundred millions of smallholder farmers. If proper control measures are not implemented, it could cause extensive maize yield losses, estimated at between 3.6 billion and 6.2 billion US dollars per year across 12 maize-producing African countries.

Over the past couple of years, the FAW has been spreading across many countries in Africa, including Ethiopia.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

GLOBAL EXPERTS PRODUCE PEST MANAGEMENT GUIDE TO FIGHT SPREAD OF FALL ARMYWORM

ADDIS ABABA– Global experts have produced a new comprehensive integrated pest management guide to fight the spread of the Fall Armyworm (FAW) which poses a critical food security threat in Africa, says the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

The guide is expected to help scientists, plant protection organizations, extension services agencies, research institutions and governments working with farmers to tackle the spread of the pest in Africa.

The FAW, which is actually the larval stage of a moth, poses a serious threat to food security and livelihoods of millions of smallholder farm households in Africa, because of its rapid spread and distinctive ability to inflict widespread damage across multiple crops.

It is an invasive crop pest which can feed on 80 different crop species, including maize, a staple food consumed by more than 300 million farm families in Africa.

The pest was first confirmed in Africa in 2016. The moth is not native to Africa and is believed to have been unknowingly transported to the continent from South America.

Experts warn that the emergence and rapid spread of the pest in Africa seriously threatens the food and income security of hundred millions of smallholder farmers. If proper control measures are not implemented, it could cause extensive maize yield losses, estimated at between 3.6 billion and 6.2 billion US dollars per year across 12 maize-producing African countries.

Over the past couple of years, the FAW has been spreading across many countries in Africa, including Ethiopia.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

ETHIOPIA EXPECTED TO OVERTAKE KENYA TO BE AFRICA’S TOP FLOWER EXPORTER SOON

ADDIS ABABA– The Ethiopian flower industry is flourishing with the help of government incentives and low labour costs, according to the the leading industry publication, “Floriculture”.

The magazine says Ethiopia is now the second-largest flower exporter in Africa, with more than 100 flower growers cultivating 1,700 hectares of land.

We are now second only to Kenya in Africa, and we expect to overtake them soon,” Floriculture quotes Berhanu Ludamo, the head of the Promotion and Information Service of the Ethiopian Horticulture Producers Exporters Association, as saying.

Ethiopia earned 250 million US dollars from horticultural export in 2014. The amount is expected to increase this year due to the expansion of horticulture farms. Berhanu added.

The area will grow to 3,000 hectares, he said, adding that Fontana Flowers will begin operation of its horticulture farm in Ethiopia with an investment of 11 million US dollars.

Fontana Flowers has leased 100 hectares of land at Wenjeta and Wegelta, 20 Km from Bahir Dar, the capital Amhara Regional State in northwestern Ethiopia.

Currently Fontana, which has hired 1,300 employees, is clearing land for growing roses and for warehouse construction. The company will exclusively grow different cut rose varieties, beginning with 65 hectares, with target revenue of 95.9 million USD a year.

The company will export to the traditional markets in the Netherlands, but it also has other direct markets in the Middle East. Four horticulture companies are already in operation in Bahir Dar. Three other India-based companies have acquired investment licences and land to engage in the horticulture sector.

Some 90 hectares of land is allocated to the companies with expected export revenue of 4.1 billon birr (about 150 million USD), he stated.

With the number of companies engaged in the flower exports currently reaching 90, more than 1,442 hectares of land are under flower cultivation countrywide. The horticulture sector in general has developed above 12,552 hectares of land, according to data obtained from Ethiopian Horticulture Development Agency (EHDA).

In the coming five years, the revenue is projected to increase to 550 million USD, according to Berhanu.

Climate is a major competitive advantage. Parts of the country south of Addis Ababa are 2,000 metres above sea level, and this gives it an ideal environment for floriculture, explained Shiferaw Mitiku, a researcher and agricultural marketing consultant in Addis Ababa.

The export-oriented agricultural policy, attractive incentives, macro-economic stability and cheap labour constitute the competitive edge for the Ethiopian flower industry, he said.

According to the Ethiopian Investment code, flower growers are offered a five-year tax holiday, duty-free imports, access to bank loans and farm lands as well as a 100 per cent exemption from payment of export Customs duties.

The competitive advantages are attracting foreign flower growers. They are coming from Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda and from Ecuador, the researcher said. The Netherlands, which is the world centre of the flower trade, is also investing in local flower farms.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

ETHIOPIA EXPECTED TO OVERTAKE KENYA TO BE AFRICA’S TOP FLOWER EXPORTER SOON

ADDIS ABABA– The Ethiopian flower industry is flourishing with the help of government incentives and low labour costs, according to the the leading industry publication, “Floriculture”.

The magazine says Ethiopia is now the second-largest flower exporter in Africa, with more than 100 flower growers cultivating 1,700 hectares of land.

We are now second only to Kenya in Africa, and we expect to overtake them soon,” Floriculture quotes Berhanu Ludamo, the head of the Promotion and Information Service of the Ethiopian Horticulture Producers Exporters Association, as saying.

Ethiopia earned 250 million US dollars from horticultural export in 2014. The amount is expected to increase this year due to the expansion of horticulture farms. Berhanu added.

The area will grow to 3,000 hectares, he said, adding that Fontana Flowers will begin operation of its horticulture farm in Ethiopia with an investment of 11 million US dollars.

Fontana Flowers has leased 100 hectares of land at Wenjeta and Wegelta, 20 Km from Bahir Dar, the capital Amhara Regional State in northwestern Ethiopia.

Currently Fontana, which has hired 1,300 employees, is clearing land for growing roses and for warehouse construction. The company will exclusively grow different cut rose varieties, beginning with 65 hectares, with target revenue of 95.9 million USD a year.

The company will export to the traditional markets in the Netherlands, but it also has other direct markets in the Middle East. Four horticulture companies are already in operation in Bahir Dar. Three other India-based companies have acquired investment licences and land to engage in the horticulture sector.

Some 90 hectares of land is allocated to the companies with expected export revenue of 4.1 billon birr (about 150 million USD), he stated.

With the number of companies engaged in the flower exports currently reaching 90, more than 1,442 hectares of land are under flower cultivation countrywide. The horticulture sector in general has developed above 12,552 hectares of land, according to data obtained from Ethiopian Horticulture Development Agency (EHDA).

In the coming five years, the revenue is projected to increase to 550 million USD, according to Berhanu.

Climate is a major competitive advantage. Parts of the country south of Addis Ababa are 2,000 metres above sea level, and this gives it an ideal environment for floriculture, explained Shiferaw Mitiku, a researcher and agricultural marketing consultant in Addis Ababa.

The export-oriented agricultural policy, attractive incentives, macro-economic stability and cheap labour constitute the competitive edge for the Ethiopian flower industry, he said.

According to the Ethiopian Investment code, flower growers are offered a five-year tax holiday, duty-free imports, access to bank loans and farm lands as well as a 100 per cent exemption from payment of export Customs duties.

The competitive advantages are attracting foreign flower growers. They are coming from Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda and from Ecuador, the researcher said. The Netherlands, which is the world centre of the flower trade, is also investing in local flower farms.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK