Daily Archives: February 5, 2018

Merck Foundation Marks ‘World Cancer Day’ this Year in Uganda and Tanzania

Merck Foundation conducts their post-training evaluation for their first graduate of ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ in Tanzania

Merck Foundation commits to long-term partnership with Uganda minister of health through providing one and two years oncology fellowship in India, Egypt, and Malaysia for Ugandan doctors

Following the ‘We Can. I can’ theme of ‘World Cancer Day 2016-18’ Merck Foundation commits to building cancer care capacity in Africa and developing countries

Merck Foundation (www.Merck-Foundation.com), a non-profit company and a subsidiary of Merck KGaA Germany (www.Merck.com) marks ‘World Cancer Day 2018’ to create awareness around cancer and build cancer care capacity with the aim to increase the limited number of oncologists across Africa and developing countries.

The CEO of Merck Foundation Dr. Rasha Kelej recently visited Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science, Tanzania to meet the alumni of ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ with the aim to evaluate the impact of the one and two-year medical oncology fellowship programs conducted in Tata memorial center in India. Through ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ foundation has trained the first medical oncologist in Tanzania, Dr. Christina V. Malichewe.

During her visit to Tanzania Dr. Rasha Kelej emphasized, We strongly believe that building professional capacity is the right strategy to improve access to quality and equitable cancer care in the continent.Dr. Christina is one of the 59 future oncologists, Merck Foundation has committed to train for Africa.rdquo;

In June 2017, BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH), and the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), released a white paper on the African continent’s emerging cancer crisis.

Over 20% of African countries have no access to cancer treatments at all, while access is limited and sporadic in other countries. Later-stage diagnosis in African patients contributes to poorer outcomes. For example, 5-year female breast cancer relative survival rates are 46% in Uganda and 12% in The Gambia, compared with around 90% in developed countries.

The first medical oncologist in Tanzania, Dr. Christina V. Malichewe said, I can now make difference for my patients. We don’t have medical oncology to manage patients through chemotherapy, we only have clinical oncologists and radiotherapists. Thus, one-year medical oncology fellowship in India has enabled me to save many lives, every day. Thanks to Merck Foundation for this opportunity in Tanzania.rdquo;

During her meeting with Dr. Christina, Dr. Rasha Kelej said I’ve enjoyed every moment with her, witnessing the great impact she makes every day on her patients#39; lives. Through her, we transform people#39;s lives every day.rdquo;

Hon. Sarah Opendi, Uganda Minister of State of Health said, Merck Foundation and ministry of health of Uganda have been partners for a very long time, we have been working together on various issues with special focus on cancer and infertility. We appreciate the efforts of Merck Foundation in building cancer care capacity in Uganda and other African countries, and we hope soon we would have world class cancer facilities and expert locally in our beloved country.rdquo;

The first fellow for ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ from Uganda Dr. Sekitene Seei Buwambaza said, Merck Oncology Fellowship program is very important to me because it is giving me an opportunity to learn and improve on the way, I have been doing things concerning the management of cancer patients. It is also ushering me into the new trend that cancer care and research is taking in this 21st century. A bond with Merck Foundation as an alumnus is going to keep me updated with new developments in cancer care.rdquo;

Fellowship Program’ from Uganda, Dr. Musana Othiniel, an obstetrician and gynaecologist from Uganda, Uganda as a country lacks a national cancer screening program yet cervical cancer and breast cancer remains the most common cancers and accounts for the highest proportion of cancers requiring treatment. The country also has a shortage of good gynae-oncology clinicians, researchers and educators in Uganda hence limiting access for women with cancer to screening, diagnostic and treatment services.rdquo;

He further added, The ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ will expand my knowledge on the selection of appropriate clinical and research methodology used in gynae-oncology. I hope to improve my skills in carrying out appropriate and evidence-based clinical diagnosis and treatment but also empower me with excellent clinical education skill to mentor other young health workers in gynae-oncology.rdquo;

While Appreciating the efforts of Merck Foundation, Dr. Damas Dukundane, Merck Foundation oncology fellow from Rwanda said When the right people are in charge then the right things happen. I am so excited to be part of this journey of change makers, where the history will remember us as the Merck Foundation fellows, who improved the lives of people with cancer in Africa, in the 21st century.rdquo;

Moreover, 50 future oncologists either joined or will join one, two or three years ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ from many sub-Saharan African countries out of which, countries such as Gambia and Liberia never had oncologists.

Merck Foundation will provide eight doctors from both Uganda and Tanzania with one -year medical oncology fellowship program. Furthermore, together with university of Nairobi, Merck Foundation established the first two-year medical oncology fellowship program for Sub-Saharan Africa.

Source:Merck Foundation

Merck Foundation Marks ‘World Cancer Day’ this Year in Uganda and Tanzania

Merck Foundation conducts their post-training evaluation for their first graduate of ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ in Tanzania

Merck Foundation commits to long-term partnership with Uganda minister of health through providing one and two years oncology fellowship in India, Egypt, and Malaysia for Ugandan doctors

Following the ‘We Can. I can’ theme of ‘World Cancer Day 2016-18’ Merck Foundation commits to building cancer care capacity in Africa and developing countries

Merck Foundation (www.Merck-Foundation.com), a non-profit company and a subsidiary of Merck KGaA Germany (www.Merck.com) marks ‘World Cancer Day 2018’ to create awareness around cancer and build cancer care capacity with the aim to increase the limited number of oncologists across Africa and developing countries.

The CEO of Merck Foundation Dr. Rasha Kelej recently visited Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science, Tanzania to meet the alumni of ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ with the aim to evaluate the impact of the one and two-year medical oncology fellowship programs conducted in Tata memorial center in India. Through ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ foundation has trained the first medical oncologist in Tanzania, Dr. Christina V. Malichewe.

During her visit to Tanzania Dr. Rasha Kelej emphasized, We strongly believe that building professional capacity is the right strategy to improve access to quality and equitable cancer care in the continent.Dr. Christina is one of the 59 future oncologists, Merck Foundation has committed to train for Africa.rdquo;

In June 2017, BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH), and the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), released a white paper on the African continent’s emerging cancer crisis.

Over 20% of African countries have no access to cancer treatments at all, while access is limited and sporadic in other countries. Later-stage diagnosis in African patients contributes to poorer outcomes. For example, 5-year female breast cancer relative survival rates are 46% in Uganda and 12% in The Gambia, compared with around 90% in developed countries.

The first medical oncologist in Tanzania, Dr. Christina V. Malichewe said, I can now make difference for my patients. We don’t have medical oncology to manage patients through chemotherapy, we only have clinical oncologists and radiotherapists. Thus, one-year medical oncology fellowship in India has enabled me to save many lives, every day. Thanks to Merck Foundation for this opportunity in Tanzania.rdquo;

During her meeting with Dr. Christina, Dr. Rasha Kelej said I’ve enjoyed every moment with her, witnessing the great impact she makes every day on her patients#39; lives. Through her, we transform people#39;s lives every day.rdquo;

Hon. Sarah Opendi, Uganda Minister of State of Health said, Merck Foundation and ministry of health of Uganda have been partners for a very long time, we have been working together on various issues with special focus on cancer and infertility. We appreciate the efforts of Merck Foundation in building cancer care capacity in Uganda and other African countries, and we hope soon we would have world class cancer facilities and expert locally in our beloved country.rdquo;

The first fellow for ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ from Uganda Dr. Sekitene Seei Buwambaza said, Merck Oncology Fellowship program is very important to me because it is giving me an opportunity to learn and improve on the way, I have been doing things concerning the management of cancer patients. It is also ushering me into the new trend that cancer care and research is taking in this 21st century. A bond with Merck Foundation as an alumnus is going to keep me updated with new developments in cancer care.rdquo;

Fellowship Program’ from Uganda, Dr. Musana Othiniel, an obstetrician and gynaecologist from Uganda, Uganda as a country lacks a national cancer screening program yet cervical cancer and breast cancer remains the most common cancers and accounts for the highest proportion of cancers requiring treatment. The country also has a shortage of good gynae-oncology clinicians, researchers and educators in Uganda hence limiting access for women with cancer to screening, diagnostic and treatment services.rdquo;

He further added, The ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ will expand my knowledge on the selection of appropriate clinical and research methodology used in gynae-oncology. I hope to improve my skills in carrying out appropriate and evidence-based clinical diagnosis and treatment but also empower me with excellent clinical education skill to mentor other young health workers in gynae-oncology.rdquo;

While Appreciating the efforts of Merck Foundation, Dr. Damas Dukundane, Merck Foundation oncology fellow from Rwanda said When the right people are in charge then the right things happen. I am so excited to be part of this journey of change makers, where the history will remember us as the Merck Foundation fellows, who improved the lives of people with cancer in Africa, in the 21st century.rdquo;

Moreover, 50 future oncologists either joined or will join one, two or three years ‘Merck Oncology Fellowship Program’ from many sub-Saharan African countries out of which, countries such as Gambia and Liberia never had oncologists.

Merck Foundation will provide eight doctors from both Uganda and Tanzania with one -year medical oncology fellowship program. Furthermore, together with university of Nairobi, Merck Foundation established the first two-year medical oncology fellowship program for Sub-Saharan Africa.

Source:Merck Foundation

Development indicators trending downward for world’s poorest countries, UN warns

The least developed countries (LDCs) � nations categorized as requiring special attention from the international community � will fall short of goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development unless urgent action is taken, new United Nations analysis has revealed.

The analysis by the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) also highlights that LDC growth averaged five per cent in 2017 and will reach 5.4 per cent in 2018, below the seven per cent growth envisaged by Target One of Sustainable Development Goal 8 on promoting sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth.

In 2017, only five LDCs achieved economic growth of seven per cent or higher: Ethiopia at 8.5 per cent, Nepal at 7.5 per cent, Myanmar at 7.2 per cent, Bangladesh at 7.1 per cent, and Djibouti at seven per cent.

The international community should strengthen its support to LDCs in line with the commitment to leave no one behind, Paul Akiwumi, Director of UNCTAD’s Division for Africa, Least Developed Countries and Special Programmes, Mr. Akiwumi said.

With the global economic recovery remaining tepid, development partners face constraints in extending support to LDCs to help them meet the Sustainable Development Goals. Inequalities between the LDCs and other developing countries risk widening, he said.

Relying on commodities

The analysis contends that too many LDCs remain dependent on primary commodity exports.

While international prices for most primary commodity categories have trended upwards since late 2016, this modest recovery barely made a dent to the significant drop experienced since 2011, particularly in the cases of crude petroleum and minerals, ores and metals.

In 2017, LDCs as a group were projected to register a current account deficit of $50 billion, the second-highest deficit posted so far, at least in nominal terms.

In contrast, non-LDC developing countries registered current account surpluses, so did developing countries as a whole and developed countries.

Projections for 2018 suggest that the current account deficits of the LDCs are expected to grow further, making worse possible balance-of-payments weaknesses.

Aid levels

Special foreign aid commitments for LDCs amounted to $43.2 billion, representing only an estimated 27 per cent of net aid to all developing countries � a 0.5 per cent increase in aid in real terms year-on-year.

This trend supports fears of a levelling-off of aid to LDCs in the wake of the global recession. In 2016, only a handful of donor countries appear to have met the commitments under Target Two of Sustainable Development Goal 17.

Denmark, Luxembourg, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom provided more than 0.20 per cent of their own gross national income to LDCs, while the Netherlands met the 0.15 per cent threshold.

This analysis signals a clarion call for action, said Mr. Akiwumi. The international community needs to pay increased attention to their commitments toward LDCs.

The analysis was presented to UNCTAD member States at a meeting of its governing body in Geneva, Switzerland, on 5 February.

Source: UN News Centre